Wednesday, August 12, 2009

8

Studio One Soul Vol.2


















Rating: 6.5/10
Sound Quality: 320 kb/s
Format: Mp3
Record Label: Soul Jazz Records
Year Released: 2005
Album Covers: Included
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About Studio One
Studio One is one of Jamaica's most renowned record labels and recording studios, having been described as "the Motown of Jamaica." Studio One was involved with most of the major music movements in Jamaica during the 1960s and 1970s, including ska, rocksteady, reggae, dub and dancehall. The label was founded by Clement "Coxsone" Dodd in 1954, and the first recordings were cut in 1957 on Brentford Road in Kingston. Amongst its earliest records were "Easy Snappin'" by Theophilus Beckford, backed by Clue J and his Blues Blasters, and "This Man is Back" by trombonist Don Drummond. Dodd had previously issued music on a series of other labels, including World Disc, and had run Sir Coxsone the Downbeat, one of the largest and most reputable sound systems in the Kingston ghettos. The label and studio were closed when Dodd relocated to New York City in the 1980s. Studio One has recorded and released music by (and had a large hand in shaping the careers of) artists such as The Skatalites, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Burning Spear, Toots & the Maytals, John Holt, Horace Andy, Ken Boothe, Freddie McGregor, Dennis Brown, Jackie Mittoo, Gladiators, Michigan & Smiley, Wailing Souls, Dillinger, Delroy Wilson, Heptones, Johnny Osbourne, Marcia Griffiths (of the I-Threes), Sugar Minott, The Abyssinians, Culture, Soul Vendors, Lone Ranger, and Alton Ellis. Noted rival Prince Buster began his career working for Dodd's sound system, and the record producer Harry J recorded many of his best-known releases at Studio One.

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

0

Curtis Fuller & Hampton Hawes With French Horns


















Rating: 5/10
Sound Quality: 320 kb/s
Format: Mp3
Record Label: New Jazz
Year Released:
1957
Album Covers: Included
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About Curtis Fuller
Curtis DuBois Fuller (born in Detroit, December 15, 1934) is a United States hard bop trombonist, primarily known as a member of Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers.

Fuller's parents were Jamaican and died when he was young; he was raised in an orphanage as a result. While in Detroit he was a schoolfriend of Paul Chambers and Donald Byrd, and also knew Tommy Flanagan, Thad Jones and Milt Jackson.

After army service between 1953 and 1955 (when he played in a band with Chambers and brothers Cannonball and Nat Adderley), Fuller joined the quintet of Yusef Lateef, another Detroit musician. In 1957 the quintet moved to New York, and Fuller recorded his first sessions as a leader for Prestige Records.

Alfred Lion of Blue Note Records first heard him playing with Miles Davis in the late fifties, and featured him as a sideman on record dates led by Sonny Clark and John Coltrane; Fuller's work on the latter's Blue Train album is probably his best known recorded performance. Fuller led four dates for Blue Note, though one of these, an album with Slide Hampton, was not issued for many years. Other sideman appearances over the next decade included work on albums under the leadership of Bud Powell, Jimmy Smith, Wayne Shorter, Lee Morgan and Joe Henderson (a former room mate at Wayne State University in 1956). Fuller is particularly proud of being the only trombonist to have recorded with Coltrane, Powell and Smith, all in August or September 1957.

He was also the first trombonist to be a member of the Art Farmer-Benny Golson Jazztet, later becoming the sixth man in Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers in 1961, staying with Blakey until 1965. In the early 1960s he recorded two albums as leader for Impulse! Records, having also recorded for Savoy Records and Epic after his obligations with Blue Note had ended.

In the late sixties he was part of Dizzy Gillespie's band, and he went on to tour with Count Basie and to reunite with Blakey and Golson. He continues to perform and record.


About Hampton Hawes
Hampton Hawes (November 13, 1928May 22, 1977) was an African American bebop and hard-bop jazz pianist.

Hampton Hawes was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. His father, Hampton Hawes, Sr., was minister of Westminster Presbysterian Church, and the first African-American to be voted into the National Presbyterian Senate. His mother, Gertrude, was the church pianist.

Hawes' first experience with the piano was as a toddler sitting on his mother's lap while she practiced; he was reportedly able to pick out fairly complex tunes by the age of two. Entirely self-taught, by his teens Hawes was playing with some of the leading jazz musicians on the West Coast, including Dexter Gordon, Wardell Gray, Art Pepper, Shorty Rogers, and Sonny Criss. His second professional job, at 19, was playing for eight months with the Howard McGhee Quintet at the Hi De Ho club, in a group that included Charlie Parker.

After serving in the U.S. army in Japan from 1952-1954, Hawes formed his own trio, with the bassist Red Mitchell and drummer Chuck Thompson. The three-record Trio sessions made by this group in 1955 on Contemporary Records were considered some of the finest records to come out of the West Coast at the time. The next year, Hawes added guitarist Jim Hall for the All Night Sessions - three records made during a non-stop recording session at the Contemporary Studios in Los Angeles.

After a six-month national tour in 1956, Hawes won the 'New Star of the Year' award in a Down Beat magazine poll, and 'Arrival of the Year' in Metronome magazine. The following year, Hawes would record in New York with Charles Mingus, on the album Mingus Three (1957, Roulette.)

Struggling for many years with a heroin addiction, Hawes was arrested in 1958 on his 30th birthday, after being coerced by an undercover federal agent to sell a small amount of heroin. Despite pleading guilty, Hawes was sentenced to 10 years - twice the mandatory minimum - in a federal prison hospital. In the months between his arrest and sentencing, Hawes recorded an album of spirituals and gospel songs, The Sermon, for Contemporary Records. After three years at Fort Worth Federal Medical Facility, in 1961 Hawes was watching President Kennedy's inaugural speech on television when he became convinced that Kennedy would pardon him. In an almost miraculous turn, Kennedy in fact granted Hawes Executive Clemency in 1963, the 42nd of only 43 such pardons issued in the final year of Kennedy's presidency.

After his release, Hawes resumed playing and recording. During a world tour in 1967-68, he was surprised to discover that he had become a legend among jazz listeners in Europe and Japan. During a ten-month period overseas Hawes recorded nine albums, including two duo records with the virtuoso French pianist Martial Solal. In the 1970s, Hawes experimented with electronic music (Fender-Rhodes made a special instrument for him), although eventually he returned to making acoustic music.

Raise Up Off Me, Hawes' autobiography (written with Don Asher) was published in 1974, and shed light on his heroin addiction, the bebop movement, and his friendships with some of the best jazz musicians of his time. The book won the prestigious ASCAP Deems-Taylor Award for music writing in 1975. The Penguin Guide to Jazz calls Raise Up Off Me, "one of the most moving memoirs ever written by a musician, and a classic of jazz writing." A 128-page Hampton Hawes biography/discography was published in England in 1987, co-authored by Roger Hunter and Mike Davis.

As a pianist Hawes's style is instantly recognizable - for its almost unparalleled swing, complex and distinctive approach to harmony, and range of emotional expression, particularly in a blues context. Hawes influenced a great number of other pianists including André Previn, Oscar Peterson, Claude Williamson, Pete Jolly, Toshiko Akiyoshi and others. Hawes' own influences came from a number of sources, including the spirituals he heard in his father's church as a child, and the boogie-woogie piano of Earl Hines. He also learned much from pianists Bud Powell and Nat King Cole among others; his principal source of influence though, was his friend Charlie Parker.

Hampton Hawes died suddenly of a brain hemorrhage in 1977, at only 48 years old. In 2004, the City Council of Los Angeles passed a resolution declaring November 13th 'Hampton Hawes Day' throughout the City of Los Angeles. A feature film about Hawes' life, based on his autobiography, is currently in development.

Monday, August 10, 2009

0

Hub Cap - Freddie Hubbard


















Rating: 5/10
Sound Quality: 320 kb/s
Format: Mp3
Record Label: Blue Note
Year Released:
1961
Album Covers: Included
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About Freddie Hubbard
Frederick Dewayne Hubbard (7 April 1938 – 29 December 2008) was an American jazz trumpeter. He was known primarily for playing in the bebop, hard bop and post bop styles from the early 60s and on. His unmistakable and influential tone contributed to new perspectives for modern jazz and bebop.

Thursday, August 6, 2009

4

Dada is under construction!

Ώτα μου για το επόμενο (μικρό) χρονικό διάστημα θα πραγματοποιούνται στη σελίδα μερικές εργασίες αναβάθμισης. Ωσότου να ολοκληρωθούν, κάποια πράγματα στο blog ενδέχεται να εμφανίζονται λίγο περιέργα...κατανόηση ώτα μου...κατανόηση και υπομονή.

Αυτιά για την ώρα.
Σας φιλώ στο modem.
Radiodada

Wednesday, August 5, 2009

0

Further Adventures Of Jimmy And Wes - Jimmy Smith & Wes Montgomery


















Rating: 5.5/10
Sound Quality: 320 kb/s
Format: Mp3
Record Label: Verve
Year Released: 1966
Album Covers: Included
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Links: rapidshare

About Wes Montgomery
John Leslie "Wes" Montgomery (6 March 1925 - 15 June 1968) was an American jazz guitarist. He is generally considered one of the major jazz guitarists, emerging after such seminal figures as Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian and influencing countless others, including Pat Martino and Pat Metheny.

Montgomery was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. He came from a musical family; his brothers, Monk (string bass and electric bass) and Buddy (vibraphone and piano), were jazz performers. Although he was not skilled at reading music, he could learn complex melodies and riffs by ear. Montgomery started learning guitar at the age of 19, listening to and learning recordings of his idol, the guitarist Charlie Christian. He was known for his ability to play Christian solos note for note and was hired by Lionel Hampton for this ability.

Montgomery is often considered the greatest of modern jazz guitarists. Following the early work of swing/pre-bop guitarist Charlie Christian and gypsy-jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt, Wes arguably put guitar on the map as a bebop or post-bop instrument. Although Johnny Smith was the guitarist in the original New York Bebop scene, and both Tal Farlow and Jimmy Raney made significant contributions in the 1950's to bebop guitar, each of these men curtailed their own output in the 1960s, creating a vacuum that Montgomery naturally filled with virtuousic playing. While many Jazz players are regarded as virtuosos, Montgomery was unique in his wide influence on other virtuosos who followed him, and in the respect he earned from his contemporaries. To many, Montgomery's playing defines jazz guitar and the sound that many try to emulate.

Montgomery toured with Lionel Hampton early in his career, however the combined stress of touring and being away from family brought him back home to Indianapolis. To support his family of eight, Montgomery worked in a factory from 7:00 am to 3:00 pm, then performed in local clubs from 9:00 pm to 2:00 am. Cannonball Adderley heard Montgomery in an Indianapolis club and was floored. The next morning, he called record producer Orrin Keepnews, who signed Montgomery to a recording contract with Riverside Records. Adderly later recorded with Montgomery on his Pollwinners album. Montgomery recorded with his brothers and various other group members, including the Wynton Kelly Trio which previously backed up Miles Davis.

John Coltrane asked Montgomery to join his band after a jam session, but Montgomery continued to lead his own band. Boss Guitar seems to refer to his status as a guitar-playing bandleader. He also made contributions to recordings by Jimmy Smith. Jazz purists relish Montgomery's recordings up through 1965, and sometimes complain that he abandoned hard-bop for pop jazz towards the end of his career, although it is arguable that he gained a wider audience for his earlier work with his soft jazz from 1965-1968. During this late period he would occasionally turn out original material alongside jazzy orchestral arrangements of pop songs. In sum, this late period earned him considerable wealth and created a platform for a new audience to hear his earlier recordings.

Wes Montgomery died of a heartattack on June 15, 1968 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

About Jimmy Smith
Jimmy Smith (December 8, 1925 [birth year is disputed and is often given as 1928] – February 8, 2005) was a jazz musician whose performances on the Hammond B-3 electric organ helped to popularize this instrument. In 2005, Jimmy Smith was awarded the NEA Jazz Masters Award from the National Endowment for the Arts, the highest honors that the United States bestows upon jazz musicians.Originally a pianist, Smith switched to organ in 1953 after hearing Wild Bill Davis. He purchased his first Hammond B-3 organ, rented a warehouse to practice in and emerged after little more than a year with an exciting new sound which was to completely revolutionize the way in which the instrument could be played. On hearing him playing in a Philadelphia club, Blue Note's Alfred Lion immediately signed him to the label and with his second album, also known as The Champ, quickly established Smith as a new star on the jazz scene. He was a prolific recording artist and as a leader, recorded around 40 sessions for Blue Note in just 8 years beginning in 1956. His most notable albums from this period include The Sermon!, House Party, Home Cookin' , Midnight Special, Back at the Chicken Shack and Prayer Meetin' .

Smith then signed to Verve Records label in 1962. His first album Bashin', sold well and for the first time, set Smith with a big band led by Oliver Nelson. Further Big band collaborations followed, most successfully with Lalo Schifrin for The Cat and guitarist Wes Montgomery, with whom he recorded two albums: The Dynamic Duo and Further Adventures Of Jimmy and Wes. Other notable albums from this period include Blue Bash and Organ Grinder's Swing with Kenny Burrell, The Boss with George Benson, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Got My Mojo Workin, and the funky Root Down.During the 50s and 60s, Smith recorded with some of the great jazz musicians of the day such as Kenny Burrell, George Benson, Grant Green, Stanley Turrentine, Lee Morgan, Lou Donaldson, Tina Brooks, Jackie McLean, Grady Tate and Donald Bailey. In the 1970s, Smith opened his own supperclub in L.A. and played there regularly.

Smith had a career revival in the 1980s and 90s, again recording for Blue Note and Verve, and for Milestone and Elektra. Smith also recorded with other artists including Quincy Jones/Frank Sinatra, Michael Jackson, Dee Dee Bridgewater and Joey DeFrancesco. His last major album Dot Com Blues (Blue Thumb, 2000), featured many special guests such as Dr. John, B.B.King and Etta James.

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

0

Play - Moby



















Rating: 7/10
Sound Quality: 320 kb/s
Format: Mp3
Record Label: Mute
Year Released: 1999
Album Covers: Included
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About The Album
Play is the sixth studio album by the music artist Moby. While some of Moby's earlier work garnered critical and commercial success within the electronic dance music scene, Play was his first true pop success. The album introduced Moby to a worldwide mainstream audience, not only through hit singles, but also through unprecedented licensing of his music in films, television and commercial advertisements.

One of the notable aspects of Play, as opposed to other electronic albums of the time, was the way in which it combined old gospel and folk music rhythms with modern house sensibilities. Moby sampled heavily from the collected field recordings of Alan Lomax in songs such as "Honey," "Find My Baby," and "Natural Blues," while the track "Run On" was inspired by the traditional "God's Gonna Cut You Down." The album also has more purely electronic tracks, as well as the rock-influenced single "South Side" and the more ambient "Porcelain."

Inside the booklet included with the album, there are five short essays written by Moby, on topics such as veganism, fundamentalism, and humanitarianism. After the essays is a disclaimer written by Moby: "These essays are not really related to the music, so if you hate the essays you might still like the music, and if you like the essays you might hate the music. Who knows, maybe by some bizarre twist of fate you'll like them both."

About Moby
Richard Melville Hall (born September 11, 1965), better known by his stage name Moby is an American DJ, singer-songwriter and musician.

He plays keyboard, guitar, bass guitar and drums. After eight top 40 singles in the UK in the 1990s he released the album Play, in 1999, which sold more than 10 million copies worldwide. His follow up albums, 18, Hotel, and Last Night sold 6 million copies and have achieved gold and platinum status in over 30 countries.

Monday, August 3, 2009

3

Rust Never Sleeps - Neil Young & Crazy Horse


















Rating: 5/10
Sound Quality: 320 kb/s
Format: Mp3
Record Label: Warner
Year Released:
1979
Album Covers: Included
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Links:
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About Neil Young
Neil Percival Young OM (born November 12, 1945, Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, musician and film director. Young's work is characterized by deeply personal lyrics, distinctive guitar work, and signature falsetto tenor singing voice. Although he accompanies himself on several different instruments—including piano and harmonica—his style of claw-hammer acoustic guitar and often idiosyncratic soloing on electric guitar are the linchpins of a sometimes ragged, sometimes polished sound. Although Young has experimented widely with differing music styles, including swing, jazz, rockabilly, blues, and electronic music throughout a varied career, his best known work usually falls into either of two distinct styles: folk-esque acoustic rock (as heard in songs such as "Heart of Gold", "Harvest Moon" and "Old Man") and electric-charged hard rock (in songs like "Cinnamon Girl", "Rockin' in the Free World" and "Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black)"). In more recent years, Young has started to adopt elements from newer styles of music, such as industrial, alternative country and grunge, the latter of which was profoundly influenced by his own style of playing, causing some to confer on him the title of "the godfather of grunge".

Young has directed (or co-directed) a number of films using the pseudonym Bernard Shakey, including Journey Through the Past (1973), Rust Never Sleeps (1979), Human Highway (1982), Greendale (2003), and CSNY Déjà Vu (2008), a documentary about the band's controversial 2006 "Freedom of Speech" tour. He is currently working on another documentary about new technology for automobiles, tentatively titled "Linc/Volt".

He is also an outspoken advocate for environmental issues and small farmers, having co-founded in 1985 the benefit concert Farm Aid, and in 1986 helped found The Bridge School, and its annual supporting Bridge School Benefit concerts, together with his wife Pegi. Although Young sings as frequently about U.S. legends and myths (Pocahontas, space stations, and the settlement of the American West), as he does about his native country (such as in "Helpless" and "Four Strong Winds"), he remains a Canadian citizen and has never wanted to relinquish his Canadian citizenship. He has lived in the U.S. for "so long" and has stated, about U.S. elections, that he has "got just as much right to vote in them as anybody else."

About Crazy Horse
Crazy Horse is a rock band best known for its long association with Canadian singer-songwriter Neil Young, despite having released five albums of its own over a 19-year span. It has been co-credited with Young as Neil Young and Crazy Horse on 13 albums, from Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere (1969) to Live at the Fillmore East (2006), and has made contributions to an additional 10 albums by the singer, including his three compilations.

Sunday, August 2, 2009

0

In A Town Called Addis - Dub Colossus


















Rating: 5/10
Sound Quality: 320 kb/s
Format: Mp3
Record Label: Realworld
Year Released:
2008
Album Covers: Included
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About Dub Colossus
Recorded by a group of adventurous Ethiopians and Nick Page, one half of the British group Temple Of Sound, Dub Colossus is a unique attempt to mix traditional East African music with the most experimental reggae sounds. Recorded first in Addis Ababa, it was completed in a two-week session at the Real World studios in Wiltshire, thanks to the involvement of the B&W Music Club.

Their first studio was a shed where electricity and water were intermittent and distractions included the noise of children playing outside, women doing their laundry, dogs barking and a cat chasing rats across the roof.

“We said we’d do it for fun,” says singer Tsedenia Gebremarkos. “We sang and did crazy stuff. We weren’t expecting anything to happen. We were just excited that somebody from Europe was interested in our music.”

After a week, the sessions finished and Nick left. “He said he would make something happen,” remembers Samuel Yerga, a 20-year-old piano prodigy. “But he did tell us it might be a long time. We just asked him not to forget us.”

“I’d been happy with the initial album,” says Page, “but when Real World talked about releasing it, they wanted to know if we could record some new stuff for B&W.”

Two years later, in the spring of 2008, most of the musicians regrouped in the west of England to work up some new songs and put finishing touches to those recorded in the shed.

Saturday, August 1, 2009

0

Balkan Connection - Dusko Goykovich


















Rating: 5/10
Sound Quality: 320 kb/s
Format: Mp3
Record Label: Enja
Year Released:
1996
Album Covers: Included
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About Dusko Goykovich
Duško Gojković (also spelled as Dusko Goykovich, born October 14, 1931, Jajce, Yugoslavia, now Bosnia and Herzegovina), Serbian jazz trumpeter and composer.He studied in Belgrade Music Academy from 1948 to 1953. He played trumpet in a number of jazz Dixieland bands and, though only 18 years of age, joined Big Band of Radio Belgrade. After five years spent there he grew into a seasoned musician and decided to continue his career in West Germany.In 1956 he recorded his first LP as a member of Frankfurt All Stars band. Next four years he spent as a member of Kurt Edelhagen’s orchestra as a first trumpet. In these years he played with legends such as Chet Baker or Stan Getz. In 1958 he performed at Newport Jazz Festival and drew much attention on both sides of the Ocean.

In 1961 he was offered a scholarship for the studies of composing and arranging in Berklee. He took the offer and finished the studies.After the studies he was invited by Canadian band leader Maynard Ferguson to join his band. Gojković performed as a second trumpet until the break of the band in 1964. His work with Ferguson boosted his reputation as an excellent big band musician and an outstanding soloist. Next he returned back to Europe, formed his sextet and in 1964 recorded his first album Swinging Macedonia, with music he originally composed inspired by the music of Balkans. The album is generally considered to be the cornerstone of Balkan Jazz. In the years to follow he played with Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Sonny Rollins, Duke Jordan, Slide Hampton etc. In 1966 he continued his career in The Kenny Clarke-Francy Boland Big Band. In 1968 he settled in Munich and formed his own big band with artists such as Rolf Ericsson and Frank St Peter that lasted until 1976. In 1986 he managed to form another orchestra with which he performs to this day. His much awaited comeback came with the 1993 Soul Connection album that won him a broad acclaim. This was followed with album Bebop City. In 1996 he recorded the Soul Collection album again but this time with his own big band. Another great album came in 1997 – Balkan Blue, a double CD: first one a quintet with Italian sax player Gianni Basso while the second one features orchestra of the North German Radio (NDR) accompanied by the jazz rhythm section and Gojković as a soloist. His next album was In My Dreams (2001) recorded with his quartet.

In 2003 Gojković opened a new chapter in his career with his album Samba do Mar, in which he composes for the first time inspired by Latin music. In 2004 he performed on the 200th anniversary of modern Serbian statehood, the opportunity he used to gather in Belgrade international All Star Big Bend with whom he recorded A Handful of Soul CD. His last album Samba Tzigane came out in 2006. Gojković celebrated his 75th birthday with a grand concert in Belgrade. During his career Gojković built his own style recognizable for the preciseness, brilliance of his technique and warm sound in playing as well as melodic tunes in composing.